How Far Is Too Far?

In light of the recent worldwide travel alert warnings of potential terrorist attacks issued by the U.S. State Department, issues surround the risks posed manly on the safety of Americans or its allies have, once again, become a major top concern. Seeing as the season is not over yet for vacationers and tourists, some have come to think just how far is considered too far to protect our country.

Take for instance the controversy over whether or not Edward Snowden, former employee for the National Security Agency, did the right thing by leaking classified information that should have been kept confidential as to how the United States finds out what goes on behind closed doors. Since this worldwide terrorist alert has been issued, many who viewed this as the United States engaging in unconstitutional behavior have changed from animosity to appreciation.

The events of September 11, 2001 have without a doubt left a serious impact on just how far terrorists will go to make a statement. With no holds barred as being their personal mission statement, it would seem feasible that we as Americans take the same stance by whatever means necessary to ensure we do not suffer the same catastrophic event ever again. But is that really possible?

Apparently, it is possible. Intelligence officials claim to have evidence supporting a possible terrorist attack to occur from now until the end of August, thereby putting embassies and public transportation systems on high alert. By announcing this recent finding, this let’s all terrorist groups know “we are on to them”, however, that does not guarantee their possible plan of attack will cease; they could change their strategy.

Should we protect our nation by any means necessary? Absolute, thanks to this so-called “infringement on our privacy” technique. We may not appreciate whatever those necessary means are, especially if it includes infringing on our privacy. If there was ever a choice to be made, many U.S. citizens can be rest assured nothing can ultimately replace their lives once lost if sacrificing their privacy means preserving it.

©2013 Learus Ohnine

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Innocent Blood From Open Borders

Terrorism– its not like its a hobby or just a fad. It is a force; a life-threatening one that can and should be reckoned with. Whenever a terroristic tragedy strikes on U.S. soil, it’s natural that we will tamper with ideologies of how and why the attacks occurred to eliminate the possibility of all future attacks. With the latest of terroristic attacks, such as with the attack on September 11, 2001 and the Boston Marathon bombings, our analysis of these situations reveals one commonality that leads to only one possible solution: enhancement of our security by means of stricter immigration laws.

Americans were alarmed to discover that Ramzi Yousef and Ahmad Ajaj, the masterminds behind the planning of the World Trade Center bombing in 1993, were allowed into the United States using false passports that showed obvious signs of tampering. Sheik Omar Abdel Rahman, a co-conspirator in the bombings and leader of “The Islamic Group” who spoke very adamantly and publicly about his “anti-american” viewpoints, was on the U.S. State Department’s terrorist watch list yet was freely allowed to travel in and out of the United States on an expired visa while conducting terrorist attacks in Egypt.

Nawaf muhammed Salim al-Hazmi, one of the chosen pilots by Osama bin Laden in the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks against the United States, obtained a tourist visa which showed evidence of his association with Al-Quaeda. Because immigration inspectors were not officially trained to be aware of this sort of evidence, he was allowed to enter and exit the United States repeatedly. In 1999, the CIA was informed by Saudi Intelligence of Khalid al-Mihdhar’s (another chosen pilot in the attack) association with Al-Quaeda but was still allowed into the United States in 2000 to attend flight school.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, one of the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings on April 15, 2013, was allowed to continue to live in the United States in spite of Tamerlan’s application for U.S. citizenship being placed on hold because of speculations of his association with Chechen terrorists. These suspicions were reported by Russia’s Federal Security Service (FSB) in 2011 to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. However, the FSB never responded to requests by the FBI for more supporting evidence of this speculation, therefore the case was closed.

Under the current immigration laws, certain offenses can disqualify an immigrant from obtaining and/or retaining American citizenship. With all the facts being apparent as to how and why the above terrorist were able to bypass these laws, it is obvious the current laws are not working. Unless stricter immigration laws are implemented immediately, we can expect more innocent blood to be shed because the United States will have failed, once again, to protect its citizens.

©2013 Learus Ohnine