Adolescence and Violence

Raising a child in this day and age can be stressful. Most parents concern themselves with protecting their children from the harmful elements that may endanger their child’s physical growth, such as keeping current with vaccinations, proper nutritional planning, and instructing exemplary hygiene practices. Taking a child’s physical well-being seriously is commendable, however, it will not guarantee a child’s healthy state of mind. Children need to be protected from exposure to the more potentially dangerous influences in their environment that can easily be misconstrued as harmless.

Television and video games, a popular form of entertainment among adolescent males and females today, may appear to be harmless at first, but they most certainly do have some sort of negative impact on a child’s psychological health, especially if the theme focuses on the complexity of violence. Television programs today do not contain the same censored quality as the programs of yesterday once had. As time moves on, the level of violence seen in these programs have become exceedingly more violent, more vulgar, and more corrupt as this seems to be what generates the highest ratings.

Video games allow the players to become one with their characters with more hands-on interaction than television offers. However, becoming one with a character whose goal is to successfully conquer a series of violent scenarios by using violent techniques in order to win runs a risk of programming a child’s mind to believe the most effective way to win in life is by the use of violence.

Some say the solution to preventing exposure to violent mediums is by monitoring what a child is exposed to. While this method may be effective to some degree, it is not a sound proof method to the fullest. Internet access has parental control loopholes where children can easily slip through restrictions to gain access to violent video games, movies, and television programs. While one parent may show great concern for the content their child has access to, another parent may not. Children sharing violent resources amongst their peers has become a common method of ensuing the circulation of violent content.

Is there any hope in the discovery of a method to prevent adolescences from being exposed to violence? One option that may be most effective is to set the example. Since children do indeed learn by example, we as adults must consider our own behaviors before we can address theirs. The slightest detail that we may overlook as influential may have a profound impact on any psychological wars our children face when managing the right choices for their own behaviors.

©2013 Learus Ohnine

“In My Jammies”

I miss my jammies
Every morning when I leave;
Sure wish I had my jammies
At work, at school, at league

Wanna take my jammies
Wherever I go;
But my jammies don’t like it
In rain, in sleet, in snow

Can’t wait to get my jammies
Back over my head
All it takes is three moves;
My shirt, my pants, my bed

That’s where my jammies
First fell in love with me;
All night we were one
With pillows, with blanket, with sheet

My jammies don’t need rest
They stay awake all night;
Protecting all around me
The left, the rear, the right

If I replaced my jammies
Sleep could never keep me sane;
‘Cause the kind of dreams they show me of
No worry, no fear, no pain

I’m gonna marry my jammies
As soon as it’s legal;
Maybe we can adopt kids named
Lil’ Snuggy, Lil’ Fleece, Lil’ Flannel

© 2013 Learus Ohnine